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Thread: Kosciuszko Nat Park Trip. (Part 3, Aussie Alps to the Vic Alps)

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    Kosciuszko Nat Park Trip. (Part 3, Aussie Alps to the Vic Alps)

    This report starts as we leave the Blueholes Campground and start to make our way back towards civilisation, retracing our way back along the Long Plain Track.
    Along the way we stopped to check out Cooinibil Hut, (on our way in the hut was in shade) it was built in 1905 replacing what was known as the Long Plain Homestead which was originally built around 1860. This hut is all that remains of a once larger complex.









    Our next stop was at the Long Plain Hut site, this along with the Cooinibil Hut had well set out campgrounds around it.







    From there we drove to the Yarrangobilly Caves complex, administered by NSW National Parks. There are a number of separate caves here formed at different times from several million years ago to the most recent which is estimated at around 200,000 years of age.
    There are a number of walks, hot springs and a whole lot more to do here, in fact in 1901 they built the Caves House/Chalet and the area became the number one tourist destination in the state shortly after.





    Considering how remote this place is, it would have been a helluva trip to get here over a hundred years ago!!
    As we did on our last visit, we chose to do the self guided walk through South Glory Cave.

    The track to the cave, the entrance to the cave, and some pics taken inside.











    The wall of this part of the cave looked like it had been adorned by aboriginal artwork. Very similar to the Bradshaw Figures found in the Kimberley!



    Just outside the exit to the cave I photographed this delicate fern and an Alpine Skink.





    As we had done it before, we didnít go to the spring where the water flows out at 27 degrees all year round from the side of a hill into a lovely swimming pool. Quite a contrast to the waters that flow from the ground on the other side of the hill at Blue Holes which were very cold!

    We now drove towards Three Mile Dam where we were going to stay the night. Just before there we called into the Selwyn Snowfield Resort. Our first problem was choosing a spot to park the van Ha! once that was done we found that the carpark was the best thing about the place. Iím sure in winter it comes alive but here in the middle of summer she was all shut up and dead as a door nail.



    On arrival at the Dam we chose a lovely site amongst heaps of wildflowers, what a spot.



    You can see our van in the distance beyond these Alpine Trigger Plants (Stylidium Montana).



    Trigger Plants or Stylidiums are one of my favourite native flowers, they have a unique method of assuring pollination and through these next few pics Iíll try to show you how that is done. They have whats called an irritable flower column which is triggered by an insect when they visit the flower. The trigger remains cocked until the insect probes the flower, it then springs upwards and deposits pollen on the head or back of the insect which then transfers that pollen to another flower.

    In these next pics you can see the column rising out from the centre of the flower.







    You can manually activate this by getting a piece of grass or similar and then tickle the centre of the flower, youíll be surprised at how quickly the pollen head will swing into action. A warning, if you have a weak heart please consult your physician before carrying out this exciting adrenalin pumping activity Ha ha!!

    There were heaps of other stunning wildflowers all around our van, here are just a few of the many I photographed.

    The Bulbine Lily.



    The Mountain Buttercup.



    Native Flax.



    The stunning Blue Sun Orchid.





    Snow Daisyís and then a Yam Daisy which have very distinctive ends to itís petals.





    Alpine Oxylobium, which were everywhere.



    Three mile dam was formed in 1882 by Chinese miners who were working the nearby Kiandra Goldfields. Open water races were built to direct the water to where high pressure hoses were then used to sluice away soil in search of gold at a rate of over 60 tonnes per hour. It is over 15 metres deep at itís deepest point, plenty of fish there as well.

    The next morning I was up early, hopeful for a nice sunrise across the waters of the Dam. Not spectacular this time but the still morning had a little colour and when the sun broke the horizon, ďwowĒ all around our van the vibrant colours and still waters were magic, witnessing such scenes made getting up early well worth the effort.









    What a lovely start to the day, from there we headed south towards Khancoban and then onto Corryong where we topped up on fuel and supplies. The destination for our next camp was the Nariel Creek Recreational Reserve on the Corryong/Omeo road.

    This particular Reserve we had passed many times but the huge crowds that camp there had always put me off. The reason for those crowds is the Nariel Creek Folk Festival which is held there each year between the 27th of Dec to the 3rd of Jan, it was now the 5th of Jan and there were only a few stragglers left with more packing up and leaving as we pulled in.

    As we looked for a spot beside the creek we noted one group that was about to leave, so we paused nearby and when they left parked the van at that spot.
    Before I even got out of the car a guy came up for a chat, ďGíday mate just lettin ya know that right near here a big brown snake is seen most daysĒ me with a glint in my eye looking around keenly for my next photo opportunity.
    He obviously thought he hadnít put the fear of God up me enough for he then said, ďYeah itís the biggest one I have ever seen and it is real aggro, a real mean buggerĒ My eyes lit up even further saying how fantastic is that, how lucky are we to find this spot. He looked at me real strange, and then walked off apparently a bit pissed with me. It didnít make sense to me at the time but later his missus came over and says her husband had wanted to move onto this site when the others left, did he tell you a tale about snakes she said Yes he did, the thing is he told it to probably one of the few people who love em and the more he tried to frighten me the more excited I became to stay. She said he just couldnít work out why I then stayed where we did. Ha!!!!

    We set the chairs up in the creek and settled back (well Jen did) to enjoy the rest of the afternoon.



    There had been recent heavy rains and after the creek had returned to itís normal height it left on the other side of the creek the most unusual rock formations! Isnít mother nature wonderful at times!!!!





    The folk festival started in 1963 and has been going strong all that time at this same location, we had never come across a better set up reserve. This first pic is of the main stage area.







    The many toilets were superbly set up, all of them having air fresheners with the walls being adorned with paintings and pictures. There were heaps of rubbish bins supplied that believe it or not looked photogenic.





    In the distance of that last pic you can see the cloud building up, we strolled to a clearing to get a better look and the mother of all storms was making itís way towards us.









    And boy did it bucket down, but it soon passed and we again strolled around taking in this lovely spot.





    On the way back to our van we noticed another unusual rock formation, and then it dawned on me, people in the past few days had had far to much time on their hands. Ha!



    Very clever to create that arch. A late afternoon storm left the sky with a bit of cloud and so we had this sunset to end our short stay here at Nariel.







    The next morning we were on the road early, there is well over 60 kilometres of dirt road as you wind through the Alps but taking reasonable care there is no problems towing on this road.





    Our destination this day was Taylors Crossing on the Mitta Mitta River. The only way to cross here is on foot via this impressive swing bridge, that is if you want to stay dry.





    We wanted to camp on the far side so I had to tow the van through. The River was running higher than when Iíd driven through it previously, and that was just the car. Still nothing ventured nothing gained so I popped the car in 4wd high and then lined up my attempt. Click on the next pic.

    MVI_0294 by Colin Judkins, on Flickr

    No probs Ha! there are a few things I did wrong, firstly I should have been in 4wd low. When crossing a rocky or boulder strewn river or creek bottom you should take it fairly steady so it is hard to build up momentum when having to crawl out or up the opposite bank, but I should have gunned it a bit earlier than when I did. Speaking to a bloke at the crossing he said a few who werenít towing had a bit of a problem up the sandy beach as they all dropped water in the wheel ruts creating a boggier softer more difficult climb. Since I was towing a 2 tonne van through I didnít feel as bad about my few attempts when I heard about the others. The height of my wheel arches on the van is 850 from ground level, so it does have reasonable clearance, just as well eh!

    With the van set up it was time to go in for a swim, and what a spot it was.







    Less than 2 ks from our site was Kennedyís Hut. One of the newer ones around it still was 50 years ago that it was built to assist with cattle grazing and for recreational purposes for the then owners. It is in a lovely location beside the Mitta Mitta River and is now in the Alpine National Park.





    This report must now come to an end, again plenty more to show you in my next one.

    Col and Jen.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

  2. #2
    Forum Enthusiast Oldblade's Avatar
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    WOW thank you nothing else to say really

  3. #3
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    As usual another great report. For some reason I can only see some of your photos in the post and the others there’s a square to click on to go to your fliker page.
    Great photos all the same

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    Quote Originally Posted by swampy View Post
    As usual another great report. For some reason I can only see some of your photos in the post and the others there’s a square to click on to go to your fliker page.
    Great photos all the same
    Hi Swampy,

    Sometimes there are too many people online and access is then limited by certain providers. All good for me to see so I hope you get to see them all as there is some lovely spots shown.

    Regards from Col.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

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    Thanks for that Col, saw a few more on the post tonight. The only thing I miss is the caption for each photo but as they say..... a picture is worth a thousand words and a lot of yours are just that.

    Swampy

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