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Thread: Kosciuszko Nat Park Trip. (Part 1, Getting There)

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    Kosciuszko Nat Park Trip. (Part 1, Getting There)

    Hi everyone,

    As Jen and I do each year, we left early Boxing Day to spend the first part of our Xmas holiday beside the mighty Murray River. We use this time to unwind from a hectic period leading up to, and of course all the festivities over the previous days.





    This spot had magnificent vistas that were enjoyed as we sat in front of our van, the waters were great to swim in to get relief from the summer heat.







    Most evenings the colour changes to the vegetation and hills across the river was something we looked forward to.









    We went for a drive around part of the Hume Weir, with a capacity in excess of 3,000,000 megalitres. it is the largest reservoir built for flood mitigation and irrigation purposes along the more than 2500 kilometre length of the Murray River.









    Around some of the bends in the protected bays the waters were so still creating some superb photo opportunities.





    Another feature of the Weir not far from the spillway is the Bethanga Bridge, one that I have featured in previous reports, it always brings memories of my father, for one of his first jobs as a junior draughtsman was to draw some of the steel to help with the manufacture of the bridge.







    Near our camp the river was always the feature as it slowly meandered past.



    But this is not always the case as during the past year there had been a number of large and severe floods in the area, this was very obvious when wedged against a nearby tree were some very sizeable pieces of driftwood.







    We went for a drive one day to a unique museum, the Pioneers Women Hut. It is one of the best, most innovative and unusual small museums we have been to in Australia, located approx. 7 ks out of Tumbarumba it is one you should definitely call into if you are ever in the area.







    The reason for this museum is to commemorate the role that women played in the settling of our land. Such a hard life they had as they supported their men and often were the sole roll model/adult in the raising of the family as the men cleared and toiled in the field.



    Inside the buildings an assortment of early memorabilia can be found and craft that women produced in a very lonely and often extremely remote location. I have featured much of this in a previous report so I will show just a couple of pics of the skill and quality of what they produced.





    Around the property I photographed these various modes of transport.









    On our way back we stopped at the historic Walwa Homestead, still privately owned the house and out buildings are National Trust listed. We were given permission to walk around the buildings which date back to 1848. Back then this was a pretty remote and isolated spot, a beautiful location with the Murray at the base of that distant hill.





    I spent part of one day trying to photograph some bugs on some nearby wildflowers, didn’t have a lot of success but did capture this moth.





    Most would realise I’m a bit partial to a sunrise/sunset. Not all are great or memorable but we did experience a couple of sunsets that were worth showing you.







    The stars were so bright each night when I got up for a pee I stood and marvelled at the display above me.





    After nearly a week we prepared for the next stage of our trip, on our last evening mother nature again seemed to give us a special send off.











    Click on the next pic for a short clip of that magnificent sky.

    MVI_9967 by Colin Judkins, on Flickr

    Well as I mentioned in that clip, the next day we headed off on the next stage of our trip, our first destination was Tumut. First settled in the mid 1800s (their First Post Office opened in 1849) there are now just over 6000 residents who live in this very pretty rural town. There were a couple of places I wanted to visit, the first being their original cemetery.



    The reason for that, was I wanted to visit the grave and pay my respects to an extraordinary man, Thomas Boyd.

    He arrived in Sydney as a convict in 1822, aged 24 he had been sentenced to life for highway robbery (until his death he claimed innocence). Due to a good character and work ethic, he was appointed to the 1824 Hume & Hovell expedition. It was said that next to Hume himself, Thomas Boyd was the most valuable member of the expedition. (Hovell was useless, a complete dud)
    He was the first European to swim accross what became the Tumut River and then the swollen Murray River onto what became Victorian soil, he swam across that with a piece of rope between his teeth which was then used to transport the gear and the rest of the party over the River. (He was also the first white man to swim across the Yarra and drink its waters. You could do that way back then).

    Following the expedition, he was pardoned for all that he did to make it a success, a few years later he returned to this area where he look up land in the Gilmore*Valley, about 5 ks from Tumut on the road to Batlow. There he reared a family*of 10 children, and*died in August 1885 at the age*of 87 years.

    The difficulty that Jen and I now had was to find his grave.



    There were many interesting headstones but this particular one stood out. I have elsewhere told the story of Yarri, an heroic aboriginal who saved the lives of more than 70 people in the great Gundagai floods of 1852. Well here is the resting place of another individual who assisted many during that event.





    The things you find when you take the time to seek out some of our fascinating history, and then finally we found Boyd’s grave.





    A few of the many historic and interesting buildings around Tumut.







    That bluestone church is called “The Immaculate Conception” built in 1863 (It’s still got me stuffed how that was supposed to have happened) Ha!

    The Old Tumut Town Bridge, only pedestrian traffic now.



    We had morning tea beside the Tumut River, just near where Thomas Boyd first crossed it, all those years ago. (193 years)





    Our next destination was the Blowering Dam on the Tumut River, it is supposedly one of the largest in NSW.



    The Dam became famous in 1978 when Ken Warby broke the worlds water speed record there.



    As we were reading that sign, a speed boat went flying by as if to say how quick am I going, well it was about 500ks slower than Ken!!!!!



    From there it was up and into the Australian Alps, all that and more will be shown in the next report.

    Col and Jen.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

  2. #2
    The Boss Smokey2.8's Avatar
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    Col your giving me ideas for the forum Meet up location.....
    Cheers
    Adam aka Smokey

    2.8's Sound great, but a worked 3.0L goes better

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    Forum Enthusiast Oldblade's Avatar
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    Awesome pics
    thanks for sharing

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    Forum Master Rusty's Avatar
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    Great pics

    Cheers Rusty

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    B'day Col
    Your moth photo is exceptional but the flower is called a status which is a weed.. So my wife tells me and she is a chronic AUSTRALIAN plant person.

    Regards
    Geoff

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    Bloody he'll..

    G'day

    Not the "B"

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    Quote Originally Posted by G&M View Post
    B'day Col
    Your moth photo is exceptional but the flower is called a status which is a weed.. So my wife tells me and she is a chronic AUSTRALIAN plant person.

    Regards
    Geoff
    Thanks Geoff,
    Your wife's a keeper, anyone who loves our native plants is special. I was aware it was a weed, my reference to wildflower was that the flower was growing in the bush (in the wild) unaided. I very rarely use a tripod and got lucky with that one as I focussed on the centre of the flowers and waited for the moth to land as I had seen them nearby.
    By the way I used to live in Montrose just off Doreen Crt and was for many years a member of SGAP, Society for Growing Australian Plants. Pass on my best to your missus.
    Regards Col.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

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    Forum Enthusiast Oldblade's Avatar
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    just noticed do you sleep in the tent and carry the camera gear in the caravan

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldblade View Post
    just noticed do you sleep in the tent and carry the camera gear in the caravan
    Ha! The tent at the start of that report was for our daughter who was with us for the first 4 or 5 days, we then dropped her at the railway station to travel home and did the rest of the trip with just the two of us.
    Col.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

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