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Thread: Mount Buffalo & Beyond.

  1. #1
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    Mount Buffalo & Beyond.

    Hi everyone,

    Prior to Xmas a couple of years ago I had two days free (mid December) I still had a couple of places I wanted to visit that year, so here is the first of a couple of reports that cover my trip..

    The first thing I wanted to do was to visit and photograph a memorial to Hume & Hovell which was located at “The Horn” the highest peak on Mount Buffalo which was named by those explorers in 1824. The next was to camp at a site that Jen and I had discovered in June, beside a lake which was only 500 metres back from the mighty Murray River.

    These first pics were taken at Milawa shortly after I had left the Hume freeway, and yes, another church. The Milawa Uniting Church was built in 1866 and only a month before my visit was sold to become a private residence.





    At Myrlteford just off the main road is a park where this magnificent Tree stands in all it’s glory. From it’s size it is of considerable age and would be quite a bit older than that suggested on the board as it is stated that over a 130 years ago it was a significant size even then.







    About 20 ks east of Myrtleford is the turn off to Mt Buffalo, as I drove up the mountain these scenes opened up before me.





    As I got higher the road markings turned to yellow, that’s so in the snow season the markings may be more easily seen.



    I drove to the furthest feature on the mountain which was the Horn Lookout. I would then visit other points of interest as I made my way back down the mountain. The Horn car park is a small area from where you can take a short walk to the summit.



    There on the edge of the mountain is a small shelter, precariously placed to maximise the view and to give a bit of protection, I can assure you it succeeded in allowing visitors to get the best out of the views that were quite spectacular.









    This info panel located beside the car park told of the huts history.



    The foot track that winds it’s way to the top is scenic in it’s own right with fragrant flowers and shrubs lining the way.





    The view at the top was quite stunning.



    I mentioned earlier that the reason for my visit here was to photograph the Hume and Hovel memorial at the Horn. With the spectacular vitas that I was enjoying and photographing I had forgotten about it completely, it was only when I was at the top that I realised I hadn’t seen it. As I walked back to my car I scanned every likely spot but to no avail. The only possibility was a spot on a large rock that once had something fixed to it. I wondered whether it had been damaged by the wildfires that over recent years had devastated large sections of this National Park, I later enquired at the Park office and was told by a ranger that it had been stolen about 4 years earlier. You can imagine my feelings at hearing that and how I felt about the low lifes that did such a thing.

    I then made my way to the the historic Mount Buffalo Chalet, the history of eco tourism and indeed National Parks in Victoria started here as the mountain many years ago cast it’s awe and beauty over early settlers who aware of it’s uniqueness agitated for the areas protection.





    In 1898 an area was set aside as Victoria’s first National Park and in 1910 the Chalet was built. It is closed at the moment for restoration and redevelopment and hopefully soon will be reopened to the public as it really is a magnificent building in a sensational setting.







    From the car park just below the Chalet is the Gorge Heritage Walk which strangely enough leads you to a Gorge with a number of lookouts that give spectacular views.
    A short distance along the walk you come to a clearing that over a hundred years ago was levelled out, so visitors could engage in a game of cricket whilst holidaying on the mountain.





    A view of part of the Gorge and one of the lookouts.





    Well it was time to push on as my camp for the night was up on the Murray and there was a fair bit of country between me and there as well as a number of things to see before then.

    On the other side of the Ovens Valley I climbed up and over a range passing some old historic tobacco buildings, tobacco being the main crop and industry in the region in years past. In the distance the Mount Buffalo range was an impressive back drop.





    I drove through the small village of Stanley where this old cottage/house took my eye.



    The next place I drove through was Beechworth, I have photographed the town and in particular the historic court precinct on numerous occasions but the conditions were perfect for a few more pics to be taken. These buildings are right along the main road and date from as far back as the 1850s, at night, they as well as many other buildings around town are floodlit.









    Behind the main courthouse is the lock up, where both Ned Kelly and his mother were held at different stages.





    I have featured Beechworth in previous trip reports so didn’t spend a lot of time there, but I will say that it is a must see destination with many beautiful buildings and a fascinating history, so do yourself a favour at some stage.

    Nearby Chiltern is another historic town that I passed through, here are a few of the buildings there to give you a feel for what the town has to offer, again I have featured this town on a few occasions so won’t go into too much detail re the towns history etc.









    My main destination since leaving Mount Buffalo, or indeed since leaving Melbourne that morning was a spot on the shoreline of Lake Moodemere. From there I hoped to view a sunrise over the lake and in addition to that about 500 metres away was the Murray River where there was an idyll spot to view a sunset. There was still a fair bit of light left in the day when I arrived at it, so I took a couple of pics of my intended camp spot and then headed off along some river tracks to the small town of Wahgunyah.







    There is still a bit to show you from this day but that and the final day of my short trip will have to wait till the next report.

    Till then,

    Regards from Col.
    Last edited by Big Col; 01-04-18 at 12:18 PM.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

  2. #2
    Is it beer o'clock yet? outback jack's Avatar
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    Another great report Col, looking forward to the next instalment

    EVERYWHERE I GO I BRING HAPPINESS, SOMETIMES ITS WHEN I ARRIVE, BUT ITS USUALLY WHEN I LEAVE

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    Looking good Col

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    As someone who has put a few roofs on in my day, I must say that roof on that hut would test my nerves.
    My wheels of choice 150 GX Prado towing a Jayco 12.37 Outback Expanda

  5. #5
    The Boss Smokey2.8's Avatar
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    Col, I have to say the lookout perched over the edge looks fantastic. Love to visit it.

    Can I ask, what camera are you running and are you post processing?

    Regs
    Adam
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    Hi Adam, I use two cameras one is a Canon DSLR 60D and the other is a Canon Powershot 120s. The reason for the two will be clearer in the final report from this trip. I would say by memory every photo shown here was the Canon 60 D it has a 18/300mm Tamron lens with a polarising filter. The filter is a must for sunny outside pics in the Australian bright light.
    Very very rarely I will do some after shot processing and that is mainly for making sure there is consistency of colour in the skies. When you take shots at different angles to the sun sometimes the sky will appear lighter or darker depending on the angle the shot was taken. I think by memory again that possibly 2 or 3 of the photos above may have had that done to them. I shoot in jpeg so you can't do a lot to a pic, if it was taken in raw then you can change everything or anything to whatever you want. That's not my cup of tea, I try and do work hard to get the pic right first time.
    Having the zoom lens helps with clarity and focus, you can zoom in on a tree, get the focus perfect then zoom out and you know the shot will be precise and the way you want it every time.
    I do work hard with my photography, my cameras are basic and now out of date but what I take is possible to be taken by anyone if you work hard and know the basics.
    Some shots in the next report still blow me away when I view them, but mother nature did most of it for me, but I was up all hours taking them so I can witness some incredible scenes.
    Thanks for asking the question Adam,
    Regards Col.
    Life is not a destination but a journey, make the most of it and remember, the worst day above ground is a whole lot better than the best one under it.

  7. #7
    The Boss Smokey2.8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Col View Post
    Hi Adam, I use two cameras one is a Canon DSLR 60D and the other is a Canon Powershot 120s. The reason for the two will be clearer in the final report from this trip. I would say by memory every photo shown here was the Canon 60 D it has a 18/300mm Tamron lens with a polarising filter. The filter is a must for sunny outside pics in the Australian bright light.
    Very very rarely I will do some after shot processing and that is mainly for making sure there is consistency of colour in the skies. When you take shots at different angles to the sun sometimes the sky will appear lighter or darker depending on the angle the shot was taken. I think by memory again that possibly 2 or 3 of the photos above may have had that done to them. I shoot in jpeg so you can't do a lot to a pic, if it was taken in raw then you can change everything or anything to whatever you want. That's not my cup of tea, I try and do work hard to get the pic right first time.
    Having the zoom lens helps with clarity and focus, you can zoom in on a tree, get the focus perfect then zoom out and you know the shot will be precise and the way you want it every time.
    I do work hard with my photography, my cameras are basic and now out of date but what I take is possible to be taken by anyone if you work hard and know the basics.
    Some shots in the next report still blow me away when I view them, but mother nature did most of it for me, but I was up all hours taking them so I can witness some incredible scenes.
    Thanks for asking the question Adam,
    Regards Col.
    Cool thank for explaining.

    I could tell from the clarity that a quality DSLR had taken the pictures. I myself is in the Nikon camp, with more bodies/lends/flashes than I know what do to with. But having done many courses and listened to the best over many years, it only takes a few basics to make a ordinary shot turn into a winning shot.
    I have to also agree with you on the zoom lens side of things and using jpeg images. Getting the right shot first time famed correctly and ready for viewing saves so much time. Not many of us have time to batch process in light room or photoshop hundreds of images out of raw.

    Cheers
    Adam
    Cheers
    Adam aka Smokey

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    Thanks again Col, nice pics once more. We went through Myrtleford I think on our Buckland River trip 2 years ago but I missed that tree. I'll have to go back now!

    We also went up to Mt Buffalo, but lucked out with the view from the Horn - the low clouds had other ideas so the only decent photos were from that shelter in the carpark


    The chalet was also undergoing extensive renovation when we were there - I guess it must all be finished now? We couldn't get in to have a look at it - you can see everything boarded up here.


    Again, just have to go back

    Did you manage to sneak in a pie at the famous Beechworth Bakery? Mmmmmmmm.....piiieeeee.....mmmmmmmmaararggglglglg
    So much to see, so little time.......

  9. #9
    Bitumen! A complete waste of money. mudduck's Avatar
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    Good stuff Col thanks for sharing
    Cheers Steve. VK2UD
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    Leading Hand Touring Rich's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing Col. Victoria really has so much to offer.

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