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Thread: Hard-mounting an ARB compressor?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Matto's Avatar
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    Question Hard-mounting an ARB compressor?

    Hi team,

    Quick Q for the Brains Trust.

    I've got a portable ARB compressor kit, which I love. However, in the spirit of "one less thing to forget", I'm considering mounting it into the ute.

    Due to lack of underbonnet space and heat concerns, I'm thinking about sticking it under the driver's seat. It's out of the way, and will suck cool AC from the cabin, at the expense of noise when it's running.

    Because anything worth doing is worth overdoing to the point of excess, I'm thinking that it would be nice not to have the driver's door open when using the compressor. Hence, I'd like to extend the air line connection to the rear bumper. The standard ARB hose will then reach all the tyres (inc the camper). However, I'm struggling with two questions:

    1. How do I get the air line out of the cab? Just poke it through a grommet, or can you get some sort of bulkhead fitting that will take an air line on each side? That seems like the better, more robust (ie, corrugations) way to go?
    2. The concept is simple - take the existing quick-disconnect fitting and stick it on the rear bumper instead of on the air tank on the compressor. But - how? I'll need fittings, and everyone says the ARB compressors use weird fittings and to change to Ryco ones. But I don't think I need to - I'm happy using the original ARB hose + accessories. I think I just need to insert a length of 10mm (???) air line between the compressor itself and the existing quick-disconnect. So I'm thinking if I put a 1/4 NTP -> Barb fitting on the compressor, maybe a check-valve, then on the other end I just need a barb-> 1/4 NTP fitting to screw onto the standard quick-disconnect socket. Maybe?
    3. Do I use barb fittings? What about these push-in fittings I see? Are they better/worse/no good? Instead of barbs (+ hose clamps?), should I be getting someone like EnZed to crimp the hose onto the fitting?


    As you can see, I have no idea what I'm doing.

    Any help will be graciously accepted. Likewise, suggestions of "just leave it as-is and don't worry about any of this, you goose".

    Cheers,
    Matt
    Chickens dig panel damage

  2. #2
    Seriously Hooked
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    Just pull the fittings out and take them to Enzed or Pirtek and see what they suggest. They don't call them the hose doctors for nothing. They have helped me out a few times, and their prices really aren't that bad.

    Have you thought of just running a short bit of rubber hose with a fitting on to hang out the door when airing up, it's what I do?


  3. #3
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    I have an ARB twin compressor (came with the car :-)) and have mounted it in the rear left quarter panel of my 76 where the jack used to mount.I unscrewed the outlet barb from the pump and got the Pirtek boys to make up braided section of hose that then screwed back in to the pump with a !/2 barb hose connection on the other end, that was to overcome the heat issues coming out of the pump and the braided section can be as long as you want. Then just used 1/2 inch air hose to my rear bumper and used nito fittings as they are quick, easy and bigger than the arb hose connections. Probably does not make much difference to performance but every bit helps.

    I purchased some rubber grommets from Repco the appropriate size for the air hose, the right size hole saw to fit the grommet, it fitted up great and for added insurance a bit of silicon for more leak proofing and securely holding it in place.

    It is a bit hard to get to with the rear drawers in place but will see if I can put up a couple of photos.

    regards
    Geoff

  4. #4
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    Sorry just another thought, the push in connections are quick and easy but prone to leaking imo barb fittings are better. But in the spirit of "anything worth doing is worth overdoing to the point of excess" you could work out you hose lengths and get Enzed or Pirtek to machine clamp the fittings.

    Geoff

  5. #5
    Forum Enthusiast
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    here area couple of photos of my compressor installation.

    Compressor mounted in rear quarter inner guard

    [IMG][/IMG]
    Where the hose comes out

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Outlet fitting - I use Nitto fittings as you can get what is called a "one touch" fitting and you just push the connector in, very easy and quick.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    They have been reduced in size but I think I need to go a bit more, sory..

    Geoff

  6. #6
    Junior Member Hoyks's Avatar
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    I did it with my Terrano II years ago, mounted the compressor in the wing of the draws and had the switch and air fitting on the outside. I had some pictures on-line, but can't hunt them down.

    Where the air came out of the compressor, I fitted a 3/8" T piece. A nipple was used to adapt the compressor output to fit one of the holes, the outlet hose screwed into another and the last had a ARB compressor pressure switch (below, around $18 at ARB).

    The on off switch turned the compressor on and off (obviously) but the pressure switch controlling a relay did the real work. The pressure switch won't handle the power that the compressor needs, so you will need a relay.

    On the hose to fill the tyres I fitted a on/off tap at the end. Probably 20 seconds of the compressor run time was just pressurising the hose, so if you can close the tap, the compressor will run it up to 100psi and switch off, so when you hook up to the next tyre you are a bit ahead.


    https://www.marlincrawler.com/air-el...ressure-switch
    Last edited by Hoyks; 20-12-16 at 07:24 PM.

  7. #7
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    I have the compressor mounted under the passenger seat, that runs the lockers and in emergency can pump up tyres.

    I prefer a small extinguisher under the driver seat
    I chose the passenger side as the battery is on that side, and you can leave the door open on the passenger side on the side of the road.

    I also have a bigger compressor in the tray with tank, just a grommet around the hose like G&M to get out of the tub, and fitted a ARB quick release fitting in the rear panel of the tub under the tailgate (screwed fitting so it screwed tight against the panel- took a couple of goes to get the correct spacers vs tape to get it a secure fit without leaks.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Matto's Avatar
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    Hi guys,

    Sorry - I just realised that I never checked back in on this thread. Thanks for all your input - I did read all the responses at the time, but Christmas was a bit manic for me and I obviously never followed back up.

    tl;dr - I've still not done this. But it's still on my list!

    Thanks to everyone for your ideas and photos. I simply had not considered using a snug rubber grommet to pass the hose through the cab wall. That's a great idea. As G&M has said - a bit of silicone and you're watertight. Love the idea of getting the braided hose made up to deal with the heat too - great idea.

    I'm keen to have the outlet pass through the cab and be on the outside of the car simply so I don't need to keep a door open while airing up. It's either stupid hot, or stupid wet, whenever I need to air up - either way it's good to have the doors closed. Still trying to decide whether I want the noisy compressor inside the cab or up under the tub. Pros and cons for both, but I think the cooler, cleaner environment in the cab will probably win out.

    Sounds like I can reuse the ARB fitting on the end, which is good. I'll steer clear of the push-in fittings, and go with barbs.

    Hoyks - my compressor already has a pressure switch on it, thankfully. And I'm guessing a relay too? Will have to have a closer look. I'll just re-use the wiring setup it's got. I get what you're saying about having it pressurise the hose - that'll save time.

    Thanks to everyone for your advice - much appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Matt
    Chickens dig panel damage

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