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Thread: First aid kits

  1. #11
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    We use those Ekko wipes too Glenyse. They would be the thing to have with kids in the car. Don't have to worry about wipes drying out. We also got ours at a market, but I think they are also on Ebay.

  2. #12
    Forum Master GlenyseT's Avatar
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    I attended a first aid refresher course on the weekend. This is the 7th course I've done as it's a requirement for work and this is the first one I've attended where I've walked out at the end of the day feeling confident I could put my knowledge into practice if need be - mainly because the advice given was very practical and down to earth without any concerns about what your sling looked like, let alone what sort of knot you tied. If it did the job then that's all that mattered. It was run by a company called Assurance first aid and the presenter was a nurse and active member of a volunteer rescue squad.

    The reason I'm bringing it up here is because she gave us a list of things to carry in a vehicle that she said are much more useful and would save more lives than your normal first aid kit. Her argument was that if you came across a situation on the road where you needed to give first aid it is highly likely that the injuries concerned would involve a lot of bleeding and / or a high degree of trauma. This is the list she gave us and their use;

    * Torch
    * Box of gloves - if multiple passengers you need to be swapping gloves so one set in a kit is not enough
    * Roll of glad wrap - wrap abdominal wounds, penetrating chest wounds, hold dressings in place, slings, torniquets
    * Bag of no name sanitary pads - much more useful for bleeding than the 1 or 2 dressings in a first aid kit that won't help more than one patient
    * Tampons - arterial bleeding (apparently they were originally designed for surgery)
    * Sissors
    * Saline
    * Tape (as in gaffer or duct tape or similar) - slings, pulling big wounds together, holding dressings on
    * Pins - to allow you to use the patients shirt as a sling

    Makes sense really, when you look at the list you can see how these things are much more useful, especially where multiple victims are involved. Needless to say, I'll be making a few changes to the contents of my kit. There are a lot of things I will keep in my kit as I think they will be useful in a camping situation but I definitely won't be paying $5 for a dressing when I can buy a packet of pads for less. (sorry fellas I realise this might make some of you uncomfortable)

    Glenyse

  3. #13
    The Boss Smokey2.8's Avatar
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    That's a great list Glenyse.
    I have attended my fair share of First Aid courses and thats the first time I've seen a decent list like that.
    I may have to adjust my kit too.
    Cheers
    Adam aka Smokey

    2.8's Sound great, but a worked 3.0L goes better

  4. #14
    Busy planning trips and mods... Red GU's Avatar
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    I have a spreadsheet which includes a list of everything in our kit, it has columns for min qty, qty on hand and any expiry dates then a little formula will put a note beside each item if all is OK or if something needs restocking / replacing due to being out of date or low on supplies. Was going to put it up here but can't work out how to post a file like that but if anyone would like a copy send me a message and I can email it out.


    Dave
    Dave and Fiona

  5. #15
    Busy planning trips and mods... Red GU's Avatar
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    Just looking at your list Glenyse I think we have everything with us when ever we go out in the Patrol but not all kept in the first aid kit. We are at the point where our kit is crammed into the box and we have trouble fitting anything else in. We always have a torch in each door pocket as well as another in the rear drawers, a roll of gladwrap in the Camper trailer and Patrol and there are probably 6 half used rolls of duct tape in various locations. We also have various rolls of strapping tape in the first aid kit as well. As for pads and tampons, when I was in the army our first aid kits had "shell dressings" and they were just like oversized elephant bandaids and the medics used tampons for blood noses on more than one occasion. Again, not in the first aid kit but there are usually some of each travelling with us.


    Dave
    Dave and Fiona

  6. #16
    Mexican Jeep Tourist tcf's Avatar
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    Thanks for that list Glenyse. They're really things that most people/couples would have around the house. One question (not trying to be funny) but are the tampons to actually stick down an artery, or just in the wound itself? I hope my situation never got bad to include arterial bleeding.

    Thanks again for a good list.

  7. #17
    Forum Master GlenyseT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcf View Post
    Thanks for that list Glenyse. They're really things that most people/couples would have around the house. One question (not trying to be funny) but are the tampons to actually stick down an artery, or just in the wound itself? I hope my situation never got bad to include arterial bleeding.

    Thanks again for a good list.
    Both. She did say that if an artery is severed it will retract and be hard to deal with but if it is just cut, then yes you can try to block it. I'm with you Tim, an arterial bleed would be extremely scary.

  8. #18
    Forum Enthusiast Ridgie's Avatar
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    This is an interesting thread and some great info. I have a very basic kit - but have added additional items. It became very apparent to me on a trip a while back when I burnt my wrist/arm, that good knowledge is essential. One 'friend' wanted to put gauze on the burn - which I had held in an ice cold river for several minutes, however it had begun to blister. Don't worry though, I commenced a regime of numbing solution! However another mate - Dr..... - said no way and smothered the wound with antiseptic cream and a non-stick pad and bandage. This made for a much better outcome when removing tha bandage later. The wound became infected because I took my time getting to the doctor, but within a couple of days of treatment, which included the silver sulfadiazine burn cream Glenyse mentioned, it was well on the mend. The nurse recommended putting on Sudocrem healing cream - which contains zinc oxide. So I now have a tub of that in the kit. And the end result is I have next to no scarring.
    Last edited by Ridgie; 26-06-12 at 10:09 PM.

  9. #19
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    Glad you had a good outcome with your burn Ridgie, and sounds like you learnt something in the process. Thanks for the tip with the cream.

    Numbing solution hay? Did it come in a bottle or can?

  10. #20
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    After Blake tripping over and hitting his chin on a timber bollard on the weekend, I realised that our first aid kit was missing a couple of what I now think are important things.

    Instant cold packs. I know you usually have something in the freezer which could probably do the job, but when things go wrong it would be good to know that these things were in the first aid kit waiting.



    The other thing was some butterfly closures. Not sure that we could have used these on the weekend, but I certainly think they could come in handy under the right circumstances.

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